The Meteorites

The “Our Amazing Universe!” exhibition also features the collection of meteorites owned by local astronomer and writer Stuart Atkinson.

Meteorites are pieces of rock and/or metal from space, that have landed on Earth. Most are pieces of asteroids, but some have come from the Moon, or even Mars. Meteorites are very rare and expensive because they are had to find. With Earth being 2/3 covered in water, most meteorites go “plop!” into oceans or lakes; others land in jungles or other wilderness areas so are never found. However, there are places where finding and collecting meteorites is quite easy. The snowy, icy plains of Antarctica are rich hunting grounds for meteorite collectors, because the dark meteorites stand out starkly against the white landscape. Likewise, deserts are great places to look for meteorites, because the dark meteorites stand out from the light sand.

Although meteorites can be very large – some are many feet across and are very, very heavy! – the meteorites on display in this exhibition are all very small. Here you can see the display…

Am Uni 010

Here’s one of the largest specimens you’ll be able to see – a piece of the famous Sikhote Alin meteorite…

FOS 022

And here’s the collection’s small piece of the Imilac meteorite, that fell in a shower of shrapnel over the Atacama Desert in Chile…

FOS 023

Also on view will be some small, and very, very rare, pieces of the planet Mars…

Am Uni 007

Visitors to the exhibition will also be able to see specimens like this, which aren’t meteorites but are meteoric in origin…

FOS 027

That’s a piece of rock that was formed when a huge meteorite hit the Earth many millions of years ago.

Here are some more pieces on view in the exhibition…

Am Uni 009

Ex pics 020

Advertisements

%d bloggers like this: